About Bertrand Russell

As a philosopher, mathematician, educator, social critic and political activist, Bertrand Russell authored over 70 books and thousands of essays and letters addressing a myriad of topics. Awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1950, Russell was a fine literary stylist, one of the foremost logicians ever, and a gadfly for improving the lives of men and women.

Born in 1872 into the British aristocracy and educated at Cambridge University, Russell gave away much of his inherited wealth. However in 1931 he inherited and kept an earldom. His multifaceted career centered on
work as a philosophy professor, writer, and public lecturer.

Russell was an author of diverse scope. His first books were German Social Democracy, An Essay on the Foundations of Geometry, and A Critical Exposition of the Philosophy of Leibniz. His last books were War Crimes in Vietnam and The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell. Other noteworthy books include Principles of Mathematics, Principia Mathematica (with A.N. Whitehead), Anti-Suffragist Anxieties, The Problems of Philosophy, Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy, Sceptical Essays, Why I Am Not a Christian, and A History of Western Philosophy.

He was arguably the greatest philosopher of the 20th century and the greatest logician since Aristotle. Analytic philosophy, the dominant philosophy of the twentieth century, owes its existence more to Russell than to any other philosopher. And the system of logic developed by Russell and A.N. Whitehead, based on earlier work by Dedekind, Cantor, Frege, and Peano, broke logic out of its Aristotelian straitjacket. He was also one of the century’s leading public intellectuals and won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950 “in recognition of his varied and significant writings in which he champions humanitarian ideals and freedom of thought.”

Russell was involved, often passionately, in numerous social and political controversies of his time. For example, he supported suffragists, free thought in religion and morals, and world government; he opposed World War I and the Vietnam War, nationalism, and political persecution. He was jailed in 1918 for anti-war views and in 1961 for his anti-nuclear weapons stance.

He was married 4 times and had 3 children. With Dora Russell, he founded the experimental Beacon Hill School. He knew or worked with many of the most prominent figures in late 19th and 20th century philosophy,
mathematics, science, literature, and politics. Active as a political and social critic until his end, Russell died in 1970 at the age of 97.

Selected bibliography (wikipedia)

Below is a selected bibliography of Russell’s books in English, sorted by year of first publication:

  • 1896. German Social Democracy. London: Longmans, Green.
  • 1897. An Essay on the Foundations of Geometry.[172] Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • 1900. A Critical Exposition of the Philosophy of Leibniz. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • 1903. The Principles of Mathematics.[173] Cambridge University Press.
  • 1903. A Free man’s worship, and other essays.[174]
  • 1905. “On Denoting“, Mind, Vol. 14. ISSN 0026-4423. Basil Blackwell.
  • 1910. Philosophical Essays. London: Longmans, Green.
  • 1910–1913. Principia Mathematica[175] (with Alfred North Whitehead). 3 vols. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • 1912. The Problems of Philosophy.[176] London: Williams and Norgate.
  • 1914. Our Knowledge of the External World as a Field for Scientific Method in Philosophy.[177] Chicago and London: Open Court Publishing.
  • 1916. Principles of Social Reconstruction.[178] London, George Allen and Unwin.
  • 1916. Why Men Fight. New York: The Century Co.
  • 1916. The Policy of the Entente, 1904–1914 : a reply to Professor Gilbert Murray. Manchester: The National Labour Press
  • 1916. Justice in War-time. Chicago: Open Court.
  • 1917. Political Ideals.[179] New York: The Century Co.
  • 1918. Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1918. Proposed Roads to Freedom: Socialism, Anarchism, and Syndicalism.[180] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1919. Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy.[181][182] London: George Allen & Unwin. (ISBN 0-415-09604-9 for Routledge paperback)[183]
  • 1920. The Practice and Theory of Bolshevism.[184] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1921. The Analysis of Mind.[185] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1922. The Problem of China.[186] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1922 Free Thought and Official Propaganda, delivered at South Place Institute[187]
  • 1923. The Prospects of Industrial Civilization, in collaboration with Dora Russell. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1923. The ABC of Atoms, London: Kegan Paul. Trench, Trubner.
  • 1924. Icarus; or, The Future of Science. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner.
  • 1925. The ABC of Relativity. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner.
  • 1925. What I Believe. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner.
  • 1926. On Education, Especially in Early Childhood. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1927. The Analysis of Matter. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner.
  • 1927. An Outline of Philosophy. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1927. Why I Am Not a Christian.[188] London: Watts.
  • 1927. Selected Papers of Bertrand Russell. New York: Modern Library.
  • 1928. Sceptical Essays. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1929. Marriage and Morals. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1930. The Conquest of Happiness. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1931. The Scientific Outlook,[189] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1932. Education and the Social Order,[190] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1934. Freedom and Organization, 1814–1914. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1935. In Praise of Idleness and Other Essays.[191] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1935. Religion and Science. London: Thornton Butterworth.
  • 1936. Which Way to Peace?. London: Jonathan Cape.
  • 1937. The Amberley Papers: The Letters and Diaries of Lord and Lady Amberley, with Patricia Russell, 2 vols., London: Leonard & Virginia Woolf at the Hogarth Press.
  • 1938. Power: A New Social Analysis. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1940. An Inquiry into Meaning and Truth. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
  • 1945. A History of Western Philosophy and Its Connection with Political and Social Circumstances from the Earliest Times to the Present Day[192] New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • 1948. Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1949. Authority and the Individual.[193] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1950. Unpopular Essays.[194] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1951. New Hopes for a Changing World. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1952. The Impact of Science on Society. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1953. Satan in the Suburbs and Other Stories. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1954. Human Society in Ethics and Politics. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1954. Nightmares of Eminent Persons and Other Stories.[195] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1956. Portraits from Memory and Other Essays.[196] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1956. Logic and Knowledge: Essays 1901–1950, edited by Robert C. Marsh. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1957. Why I Am Not A Christian and Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects, edited by Paul Edwards. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1958. Understanding History and Other Essays. New York: Philosophical Library.
  • 1959. Common Sense and Nuclear Warfare.[197] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1959. My Philosophical Development.[198] London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1959. Wisdom of the West, edited by Paul Foulkes. London: Macdonald.
  • 1960. Bertrand Russell Speaks His Mind, Cleveland and New York: World Publishing Company.
  • 1961. The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell, edited by R. E. Egner and L. E. Denonn. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1961. Fact and Fiction. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1961. Has Man a Future? London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1963. Essays in Skepticism. New York: Philosophical Library.
  • 1963. Unarmed Victory. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1965. Legitimacy Versus Industrialism, 1814–1848. London: George Allen & Unwin (first published as Parts I and II of Freedom and Organization, 1814–1914, 1934).
  • 1965. On the Philosophy of Science, edited by Charles A. Fritz, Jr. Indianapolis: The Bobbs–Merrill Company.
  • 1966. The ABC of Relativity. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1967. Russell’s Peace Appeals, edited by Tsutomu Makino and Kazuteru Hitaka. Japan: Eichosha’s New Current Books.
  • 1967. War Crimes in Vietnam. London: George Allen & Unwin.
  • 1951–1969. The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell,[199] 3 vols., London: George Allen & Unwin. Vol. 2, 1956[199]
  • 1969. Dear Bertrand Russell… A Selection of his Correspondence with the General Public 1950–1968, edited by Barry Feinberg and Ronald Kasrils. London: George Allen and Unwin.